Saint Meinrad Archabbey

A catholic monastery devoted to the teachings of St. Benedict

Duties and Promises

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Benedictine Oblate life is primarily a spiritual life. The key to this life is found in the Rule of St. Benedict: "That God may be glorified in all things" (RB 57:9). For the oblate, "all things" encompasses prayer, work, studies, church, recreation, family, friends and even enemies. The oblate truly seeks God in every aspect of life.

What is expected of an oblate? The duties are not difficult or overwhelming. Yet, if they are faithfully carried out, the oblate will find one's ordinary Christian life has become more spiritually satisfying.

Duties

  • Pray daily the Liturgy of the Hours. Morning and evening prayer are included in the Liturgy of the Hours for Benedictine Oblates, available for sale from the Oblate Office.
  • Read from the Rule of St. Benedict each day.
  • Practice lectio divina each day. This meditative reading from the Scripture or other religious writings expands the oblate's love, knowledge and appreciation of the spiritual way of life.
  • Participate frequently in the sacraments of the Eucharist and Reconciliation. (Oblates who are not Roman Catholic should be faithful to their denominational beliefs of church and prayer.)
  • Be attentive to God's presence in ordinary, daily life.

Promises

  • Stability of Heart - This promise expresses the oblate's commitment to a particular monastic community. Stability of heart reaffirms the basic promise of conversion made at baptism.
  • Fidelity to the Spirit of Monastic Life - This promise expresses a commitment to live a life of spirituality, piety and balance.
  • Obedience to the Will of God - This is a promise to grow in discernment of God's will through prayer, spiritual direction and faithfulness to one's religious traditions. Obedience is not a series of acts grudgingly done, but the response of a willing heart in service to God.

Oblate life is formed through community. The oblate is affiliated spiritually with Saint Meinrad and thus shares in the prayer, work, love and commitment of the community. The oblates also form community in chapters and among their family, friends and church. By being part of the Benedictine community, the oblate is able to live more fully the Christian life.